Samstag, 15. August 2009

Assumptio Mariae &


Meister der Legende der Heiligen Lucia
Maria als Himmelskönigin
hier gefunden

Heute gedenkt die Kirche der leiblichen Aufnahme Mariens in den Himmel.



Im Jahre 2008 hielt Papst Benedikt XVI. in der Messe am Hochfest der Aufnahme Mariens in den Himmel in der Pfarrkirche San Tommaso da Villanova in Castelgandolfo diese Predigt dazu:

"Jedes Jahr begehen wir mitten im Sommer das Hochfest der Aufnahme der seligen Jungfrau Maria in den Himmel, das älteste Marienfest. Es bietet uns die Gelegenheit, zusammen mit Maria die Höhen des Geistes zu erklimmen, wo wir die reine Luft des übernatürlichen Lebens atmen und die authentischste Schönheit betrachten, die Schönheit der Heiligkeit."

Weiter hier.

Das Schöne am Lutheraner-Sein ist, man kann sich das Angenehme am Katholizismus zu eigen machen und das Zweifelhafte ungestört beiseite lassen, und ich bin nun mal ein großer Marienverehrer (wirklich, das „Ave Maria“ gehört zu den wenigen lateinischen Texten, die ich sicher auswendig kann und auch regelmäßig benutze).

Als ich nach einem passenden Musikstück suchte, kam mir sogleich das „Sanctus“ aus der h-Moll-Messe von Johann Sebastian Bach in den Sinn, warum (der Hl. Bach möge mir verzeihen, tatsächlich, ich denke, wenn Lutheraner heiliggesprochen werden könnten, er wäre einer der ersten Anwärter), ich finde das „Sanctus“ hat auch etwas von einem geistlichen Radetzkymarsch, mit dem der Teufel in Grund und Boden gesungen wird. Und darum paßt es zum heutigen Tag. Allerdings ist bei diesem Beispiel die Aufnahmequalität etwas trötig, dieses hier wäre da besser (dafür allerdings nicht ganz so knackig).

Um bei Bach zu bleiben, etwas besinnlicher wäre da etwa das Magnificat in D-Dur, BWV 243:



Ach, und dann ist Matthias Claudius am 15. August 1740 geboren, sein „Abendlied“ ist hier zu finden. Und Hruotland, Graf der bretonischen Mark, auch als Roland bekannt und im „Rolandslied“ verewigt, starb am 15. August 778, war mir im letzten Jahr auch schon aufgefallen. Über den Tod von Macbeth (Mac Bethad mac Findlàich) am 15. August 1057 habe ich noch nie was geschrieben, wäre wohl auch, gelinde gesagt, anmaßend.

Da gibt es jemand Unübertreffbaren:

“Tomorrow, and tomorrow, and tomorrow
Creeps in this petty pace from day to day
To the last syllable of recorded time;
And all our yesterdays have lighted fools
The way to dusty death. Out, out, brief candle!
Life's but a walking shadow, a poor player
That struts and frets his hour upon the stage
And then is heard no more. It is a tale
Told by an idiot, full of sound and fury,
Signifying nothing.“

„Morgen, und morgen, und dann wieder morgen,
Kriecht so mit kleinem Schritt von Tag zu Tag,
Zur letzten Silb auf unserm Lebensblatt;
Und alle unsre Gestern führten Narren
Den Pfad zum staubigen Tod. Aus, kleines Licht!
Leben ist nur ein wandelnd Schattenbild,
Ein armer Komödiant, der spreizt und knirscht
Sein Stündchen auf der Bühn und dann nicht mehr
Vernommen wird; ein Märchen ists, erzählt
Von einem Blödling, voller Klang und Wut,
Das nichts bedeutet.“

MACBETH V,5.

Wir wollen freundlicher enden - mit dem heutigen Garten:





Kommentare:

MartininBroda hat gesagt…

Assumption of Mary & - Translation

Today the church commemorates Mary was physically received into Heaven (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Assumption_of_Mary).

In 2008 Pope Benedict XVI was preaching in mass at the solemnity of the assumption of the Blessed Virgin Mary in St Thomas of Villanova Parish, Castel Gandolfo:

“The Solemnity of the Assumption of the Blessed Virgin Mary, the oldest Marian Feast, returns every year in the heart of summer. It is an opportunity to rise with Mary to the heights of the spirit where one breathes the pure air of supernatural life and contemplates the most authentic beauty, the beauty of holiness.”
Read more here (http://www.vatican.va/holy_father/benedict_xvi/homilies/2008/documents/hf_ben-xvi_hom_20080815_assunzione_en.html)

The wonderful to be Lutheran is, you can choose the pleasant things at the Catholicism and leave the doubtful aside, and I am indeed a great admirer of Mary (really, „Ave Maria“ belongs to the few Latin texts, which I know by heart and also regularly use).

When I was looking for a suitable music piece immediately the “Sanctus” from the B minor Mass of Johann Sebastian Bach came to my mind, why (the Holy Bach may forgive me, actually, I guess, if Lutherans could be canonized he would be one of the first candidates), I thought the “Sanctus“ was a bit something like a religious Radetzky march, which was the devil fighting to the ground with singing. And therefore it fits the today's day. However the sound quality is somewhat noisy, this would be a better example - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MBRAgawwUKk (but however not so crisp (or firm)).

To stay at Bach, something more contemplative - the Magnificat in D major (BWV 243).

Oh, and then Matthias Claudius was born on August 15th 1740, his „evening song“ is to be found here (http://martininbroda.blogspot.com/2009/06/matthias-claudius-oder-die-farbe-gold-3.html). And Hruotland, count of the Breton Mark, also known as Roland and in the “Roland song“ eternalised died on August 15th 778, to me in the last year already been noticeable. About the death of Macbeth (Mac Bethad mac Findlàich) on August 15th 1057 I never wrote something, that would be probably, gentle said, uncouth.

There is someone nobody could outperform:

“Tomorrow, and tomorrow, and tomorrow
Creeps in this petty pace from day to day
To the last syllable of recorded time;
And all our yesterdays have lighted fools
The way to dusty death. Out, out, brief candle!
Life's but a walking shadow, a poor player
That struts and frets his hour upon the stage
And then is heard no more. It is a tale
Told by an idiot, full of sound and fury,
Signifying nothing.“

MACBETH V, 5.

We want to end friendlier - with the today's garden.

Pilgrim hat gesagt…

You are lutheran, not prussian Union? Anyway, it´s strange for the heretics to have a faible for Ste. Marie. And Bach sainted? Whishful thinking. He never wrote an Ave Maria. So long, Propz Pilgrim

MartininBroda hat gesagt…

So perhaps I’m a strange heretic, anyway. Btw, you know a lot about heretic Protestants for a Wallonian catholic; no, I lived for a long time in Potsdam, but was born in Mecklenburg, so I’m indeed a Lutheran. Of course, the remark about Bach was a bit ironic, I guess it’s necessary to have a bit humour even in religious issues, only fanatics haven’t one. But seriously said I really think there is no religious music more profound than Bach’s music. Sorry, it’s not the weather for witty comments, what about the exhibition? Good luck with the leg.

naturgesetz hat gesagt…

Thanks for the Bach selections. thirty or more years ago the host of the "Morning Pro Musica" on WGBH decided to broadcast a Bach cantata every Sunday morinig. He decided to play them in the numerical order of the Schmieder BWV. When he began, not all of the cantatas were available, but one of the most extensive sets was that of Karl Richter. It seems that he may be one of those responsible for the recent surge in interest in the Bach cantatas. I don't think I've seen a video of Richter conducting until now. It was enjoyable to see him at work.

Thanks also for the words about the Solemnity.

You say about it's not the weather for witty comments, but since reading your remark about the advantage of being Lutheran I've been trying unsuccessfully to come up with a conclusion for the refrain that would begin "Da sprach der alte / Hauptmann der Luth'raner …" Unfortunately my German is too weak for anything to come to mind until just now. Maybe "Außer der Kirche / Der Glaube steht fest." Anyway,it's good to know that you don't feel compelled to reject a doctrine or practice merely because it comes from Rome.

Also, interesting about Roland and Macbeth. I hadn't known that about either of them.

MartininBroda hat gesagt…

Thanks, I’m glad you like the post especially the Bach selections, I adore him indeed (not with a religious meaning although I made this little joke). Sorry I couldn’t find the poem you’ve quote, but it sounds interesting, so with more words maybe I could google it. The advantage of being Lutheran, I guess it’s worth to say more about it a bit later, but I will say now, it’s just the opposite, even if the theological foundation is indeed different I really try to accept doctrines from Rome or in on other words I consider them honestly, but as a Lutheran you are allowed to reject. Thanks for the visit.

naturgesetz hat gesagt…

There is a humorous song that the Rothenburger Junge Schar used to sing in the tavern, "Der Hauptmann der Indianer." It's about the planned building of a railroad in the western U.S. during the 19th Century. I forget the third line of the refrain, but the rest of it goes "Da sprach der alte / Hauptmann der Indianer / … / Und wild ist der West." The third line had something to do with the job being difficult.

I was rather pleased with myself that my parody rhymed "fest" with "West."

If you can find it maybe you can come up with something better for the last two lines, but it's just a bit of foolishness on my part, so don't feel you have to trouble yourself further.